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In Memoriam

THE FORMATION OF THE GRAND COMMANDERIES AND
THE COMMANDERIES SUBORDINATE TO THE GRAND ENCAMPMENT
REFERENCES: scanned from Knight Templar Magazines
and converted to word.doc, then to html and .pdf, hence possible spelling errors due to OCR.
1986 (pages 28&29, Sep, Oct, Nov & Dec)
1987 (pages 28&29, Jan, Feb, Mar, Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct, Nov)
1988 (page 328, Jan)
2015 & 2018 Triennial Proceedings plus Info Sep 2019
BACK to 1816/history.htm


Grand Encampment was established by delegates from the Grand Commanderies of New York and of Massachusetts & Rhode Island. These two Grand Commanderies gave allegiance to this new supreme governing body. Since its formation in 1816, fifty-nine additional Grand Commanderies have been organized, making a total of sixty one. Of these, sixty are still in existence, one in each state, one in Massachusetts & Rhode Island, and one in the District of Columbia. Ten have been chartered outside of the United States. The Grand Commandery of Indian Territory was consolidated with the Grand Commandery of Oklahoma, following the formation of the State of Oklahoma.

PRECEDENCE OF GRAND COMMANDERIES BASED
UPONTHE DATES OF THEIR RESPECTIVE
ORGANIZATIONS
1. Massachusetts and Rhode Island -May 6, 1805.
2. New York -June 18, 1814.
3. Virginia-November 27, 1823.
4. Vermont - June 27, 1824.
5. New Hampshire-June 13, 1826.
6. Connecticut-September 13, 1827.
7. Ohio-October 24, 1843.
8. Kentucky-October 15, 1847.
9. Maine-May 5, 1852.
10. Pennsylvania-April 12, 1854.
11. Indiana-May 16, 1854.
12. Texas-January 18, 1855.
13. Mississippi- January 21, 1857.
14. Michigan-April 7, 1857.
15. Illinois-October 27, 1857.
16. California-August 10, 1858.
17. Tennessee- October 12, 1859.
18. Wisconsin- October 20, 1859.
19. New Jersey- February 14, 1860.
20. Georgia-April 25, 1860.
21. Missouri-May 22, 1860.
22. Alabama-December 1, 1860.
23. Louisiana-February 12, 1864.
24. Iowa - June 6, 1864.
25. Minnesota-October 23, 1865.
26. Kansas-December 29, 1868.
27. Maryland-January 23, 1871.
28 Nebraska-December 27, 1871.
29 Arkansas-March 25, 1872.
30 West Virginia-February 25, 1874
31 Colorado-March 14, 1876.
32 North Carolina-May 10, 1881.
33 South Dakota-May 14, 1884.
34 Oregon-April 13, 1887.
35 Washington-June 2, 1887.
36 Wyoming-March 7, 1888.
37 Montana-May 14, 1888.
38 North Dakota-June 16, 1890.
39 Arizona-November 16, 1893.
40 Florida-August 15, 1895.
41 *Indian Territory-December 27, 1895.
42 District of Columbia-January 14, 1896.
43 * Oklahoma-February 10, 1896.
44 New Mexico-August 21, 1901.
45 Idaho-August 31, 1904.
46 South Carolina-March 25, 1907.
47 Utah-April 20, 1910.
48 Nevada-April 15, 1918
49 Philippines-December 31, 1963
50 Delaware-August 20, 1991
51 Italy-August 20, 1991
52 Alaska-August 18, 2003
53 Portugal-August 18, 2003
54 +Mexico-August 15, 2006
55 Romania-August 18, 2009
56 Togo-August 19, 2009
57 Croatia-August 14, 2012
58 Hawaii-August 14, 2012
59 Panama-August 14, 2012
60 Austria-August 12, 2015
61 Brazil-August 12, 2015
* Indian Territory Consolidated October 6, 1911
as The Grand Commandery of Oklahoma
+ Charter Suspended August 14, 2012
Restored August 2018

A history of the formation of each of these Grand Commanderies is given. The Grand Commanderies are taken up in alphabetical order. In each instance the subordinate Commanderies entering into the formation of the Grand Body are given with the date of their Dispensation and Charter . These dates are as accurate as a careful search of the Proceedings of the Grand Encampment can make them. The dates of the granting of the Charter are the date on which the Grand Encampment took action on the application. It is entirely possible that another date may appear on the Charter as finally issued by the Grand Recorder.
The early records are often deficient in giving detailed information in regard to these subordinate Commanderies, and occasionally records have been confused.

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THE FORMATION OF THE GRAND COMMANDERIES AND
THE COMMANDERIES SUBORDINATE TO THE GRAND ENCAMPMENT ( updated 2019).

ALABAMA

On September 4, 1860, a dispensation was granted by Grand Master B. B. French to representatives of four Commanderies to establish the Grand Commandery of Alabama. Sir Knight William Field of Rhode Island, as proxy of the Grand Master, instituted the Grand Commandery at Montgomery on December 1, 1860. Sir Knight Richard F. Knott was the first Grand Commander. The first Commandery in Alabama, Washington No. 1, was established at Marion by a dispensation issued on January 2, 1841. At the meeting of the Grand Encampment on September 12, 1844, a charter was granted. Washington No. 1 made no returns after August 1, 1854, and was probably inactive at the time of the formation of the Grand Commandery in 1860. In the Proceedings of the Conclave of the Grand Encampment of September 14, 1829, mention is made of Barker Encampment in Alabama. The occasion is an appeal by Sir Knight Perez Snell seeking reinstatement in that Encampment from which he claimed he was unjustly expelled. There is no further mention of Barker Encampment until September 16 , 1847, when a charter was to be granted to Barker Encampment at Claiborne, Alabama, as soon as they complied with the requirement of the General Grand Constitution and had made returns to the General Grand Recorder. There is no mention or date of when this­ dispensation was granted. Barker Encampment evidently became dormant for no further mention is made in regard to it. Mobile No. 2 at Mobile received a dispensation from Deputy General Grand Master J. K. Stapleton on April 7, 1848. On September 13, 1850, at the Conclave of the Grand Encampment, the dispensation was renewed, and the Grand Master was authorized to issue a charter when proper returns had been made. The charter was granted on March 18, 1851, and the Commandery was consti­tuted on May 21, 1851, by Sir Knight William Hendrix, the Eminent Commander of Washington No. 1. Tuscumbia No. 3 at Tuscumbia received a dispensation from Grand Master W. B. Hubbard on August 1, 1848, and a charter on September 12, 1850. The Commandery was constituted on October 12, 1850. Montgomery No. 4 at Montgomery was granted a dispensation on October 21, 1850, by Charles W. Moore, General Grand Generalissimo, and a charter on September 16, 1853. Selma No. 5 at Selma, was formed on May 13, 1858, and was granted a Charter on September 16, 1859.
In 1948 there were 24 Commanderies and 6,133 members.2019-1,150

ALASKA
Alaska No. 7, Fairbanks A petition for a Commandery was presented to the Grand Encampment at the Conclave of 1910 and was referred to the Committee on Charters and Dispensations. They recommended that the application be referred to the incoming Grand Master, G. M. Melish. After some correspondence, a Dispensation was granted on July 17, 1911. At the Conclave of 1913, a Charter was granted on August 14, and the new Commandery was constituted on September 27, 1913, by Sir John R. Thompson as proxy for the Grand Master. Sir Edward Hill Mack was elected Eminent Commander.
Anchorage No. 2, Anchorage On July 1, 1920, a Dispensation was granted by Grand Master J. K. Orr. A Charter was granted on April 27, 1922.
Members 2019-359

ARIZONA

On October 21, 1893, a petition from the three Commanderies in Arizona was received by the Grand Master, Hugh Mccurdy, praying for authority to establish a Grand Commandery in Arizona. The Grand Master issued a warrant designating Sir Knight George J. Roskruge, a Past Eminent Commander of Arizona Commandery No. 1, to act as his proxy in constituting the Grand Commandery. This was carried out at the convention held in Phoenix on November 16, 1893.
The first Commandery in the state of Arizona was No. 1 at Tucson, established by a dispensation issued by Grand Master Benjamin Dean on February 22, 1883. A charter was granted on August 23, 1883, at the meeting of the Grand Encampment. Ivanhoe No. 2 at Prescott received a dispensation on February 17, 1891, and Phoenix No. 3 at Phoenix on May 11, 1891. Both were granted charters at the meeting of the Grand Encampment on August 11, 1892.
In 1948 there were 7 Commanderies and 905 members.2019-587

ARKANSAS

On February 24, 1872, Sir J. Q. A. Fellows, the Grand Master, granted the petition of four Commanders in the state of Arkansas, and authorized the organization of a Grand Commander. On March 25, 1872, at a convention held in Fort Smith, the Grand Commander of Arkansas was constituted. Sir Luke E. Barber of Little Rock was elected the first Grand Commander.
Hugh de Payne's No. 1 at Little Rock was the first Commander to be established in Arkansas . A dispensation granted by Grand Master W.B. Hubbard on December 20, 1853, designated Sir Knight Albert Pike as the first Eminent Commander. The charter was granted on September 10, 1856.
More than ten years elapsed before Bertrand du Guesclin No. 2 at Camden received a dispensation on April 13, 1867, from Grand Master Henry L. Palmer. A charter was granted on September 18, 1868, at the meeting of the Grand Encampment. Jacques de Molay No. 3 at Fort Smith received a dispensation from Grand Master W. S. Gardner on December 30, 1868, and Baldwin No. 4 at Fayetteville on April 28, 1871. Both received a charter at the meeting of the Grand Encampment on September 22, 1871.
In 1948 there were 15 Commanderies and 2,537 members.2019-778

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CALIFORNIA

On May 16, 1858, a dispensation was granted by Grand Master William B. Hubbard for the formation of the Grand Commandery of California. The Grand Commandery was organized on August 10, 1858, and Sir Knight Isaac Davis was chosen as the first Grand Commander.
San Francisco No. 1 at San Francisco received a dispensation from Grand Master W. B. Hubbard on November 10, 1852, and was granted a charter on September 19, 1853.
Sacramento No . 2 at Sacramento was granted a dispensation by Grand Master W. B. Hubbard on May 23, 1853. The charter was granted at the meeting of the Grand Encampment on September 19, 1853. Pacific No. 3 at Columbia received a dispensation from Grand Master W. B. Hubbard on February 20, 1856, and was granted a charter on September 10, 1856. In 1848 there were 65 Commanderies and 13,915 members .2019-2,546

COLORADO

The Grand Commandery of Colorado was the first . Grand Commandery to be formed in a territory . A dispensation was granted on February 10, 1876, by Grand Master James H. Hopkins. The Grand Commandery was constituted on March 14, 1876 , by Sir Knight Webster D. Anthony of Denver. Sir Knight Henry M. Teller was the first Grand Commander. The first Commandery, Colorado No. 1 at Denver, was granted a dispensation on January 13, 1866, by Grand Master Henry L. Pa l mer. On November 8 of the same year, he granted a dispensation for Central City Commandery No. 2 at Central City. Both received their charter at the meeting of the Grand Encampment on September 18, 1868.
Pueblo No. 3 at Pueblo, received a dispensation from Grand Master J. Q. A. Fellows on August 17, 1874, and was granted a charter on December 3, 187 4.
In 1948 there were 36 Commanderies and 3,839 members .2019-772

CONNECTICUT

Organized Templary was established in Connecticut with the formation of an Encampment at Colchester in July 1796 by three Sir Knights hailing from three regular Encampments. Application was made to London for a charter, which was granted in 1801. This Commandery was known as Washington No. 1. At the second meeting of the General Grand Encampment , a charter of recognition was granted on September 16, 1819. In 1825, Washington Encampment No. 1 asked the General Grand Encampment for authority to hold its meetings in different towns in the state. This request was denied by Sir Henry Fowle, and when attempts were made to organize a new Encampment in the state, Washington No . 1 opposed it as injurious to them. However, New Haven No . 2 was granted a dispensation November 5, 1825, by the Grand Master, DeWitt Clinton. A charter was granted on September 19 , 1826. Clinton No . 3 at Washington was formed by a dispensation issued February 9, 1827.
While Washington No. 1, now at Hartford, had opposed the formation of other Encampments in the state, they voted to send representatives for the purpose of organizing a state-wide Grand Encampment. Accordingly, representatives of these three Encampments met in New Haven on September 13, 1827, and organized the Grand Encampment of Connecticut. Sir John R. Watrous was chosen as the first Grand Master. At the meeting of the Grand Encampment on September 15, 1829, the Committee on the Activities of General Grand Officers reported that "from the documents presented it appears that there has been established with the approbation of the M.E. Deputy General Grand Master {Sir Jonathan Nye) a Grand Encampment in the State of Connecticut."
In 1948 there were 12 Cornrnanderies and 4,033 members.2019-684

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DELAWARE (NEW INFO)

Chartered August 20, 1991, Members 2019-237
History of Washington Encampment No.1 in Wilmington - 1814
St. John's Commandery No.1, K.T, Trinity Commandery No.3,

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

The first Cornrnandery organized in the District of Columbia was Washington No. 1 in Washington City, which was granted a charter on January 14, 1825, by the Deputy General Grand Master, Sir Henry Fowle. At the meeting of the General Grand Encampment in 1826, the Comrnandery was given the privilege of holding its meeting anywhere in the District of Columbia. The anti-Masonic excitement, corning soon after its organization stopped all work for nearly ten years. Even at the meeting of the General Grand Encampment held in Washington in 1835, it was reported that the officers elected has not been installed. By action of the Grand Encampment, Sir Jonathan Nye was authorized to install their officers. Evidently the revival was temporary, for it was reported at the Triennial Conclave in 1847 that Washington No. 1 was reorganized by Sir Knight Joseph K. Stapleton, the General Grand Generalissimo. Sir Knights Albert Pike, B. B. French, and Albert Mackey were members of this Cornrnandery.
Columbia No, 2 at Washington, was granted a dispensation from Grand Master French on January 13, 1863, and a charter on September 6, 1865. Potomac No. 3 at Georgetown received a dispensation from Grand Master W. S. Gardner on March 11, 1870, and was granted a charter on September 21, 1871. DeMolay No.
4 at Washington was granted a dispensation from Grand Master J. Q. A. Fellows on February 19, 1872, and a charter on December 3, 187 4. This was the first mounted Commandery. Orient No. 5 at East Washington was granted a charter on August 29, 1895, on presenting a petition to the Grand Encampment at its meeting on that date. It was instituted on October 19, 1895, by Sir Frank H. Thomas, the Grand Captain of the Guard as proxy for the Grand Master. Washington No. 1, Columbia No. 2, DeMolay No. 4, and Orient No. 5 met in convention on January 14, 1896, and organized the Grand Commandery of the District of Columbia by authority of a warrant issued by Grand Master W. La Rue Thomas on December 2, 1895. Potomac No. 3 joined with the other Commanderies on January 14, 1896, at the organization meeting. Sir Knight Noble D. Larner was elected as the first Grand Commander.
In 1948 there were five Comnanderies and 2,322 members.2019-228

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FLORIDA

On March 17, 1851, DeMolay Encampment No. 1 at Quincy was granted a dispensation by Grand Master W. B. Hubbard. At the meeting of the Grand Encampment on September 19, 1853, this dispensation was continued. In 1856 the Grand Recorder reported that he had received no report or returns from this Encampment. However, in March 1857, returns were made with a remittance of fifty dollars for dues. The Grand Master on March 17, 1857, therefore, continued the dispensation to 1859.
Returns were made to August 1, 1858, but none after that date, and DeMolay Encampment No. 1 became dormant.
On June 20, 1868, Coeur de Lion No. 1 at Warrington received a Dispensation from Grand Master H. L. Palmer. A Charter was granted on September 18, 1868. This Commandery was later moved to Pensacola.
Damascus No. 2 at Jacksonville received a Dispensation on May 18, 1870, from Grand Master W. S. Gardner, and was granted a Charter on September 21, 1871.
The Commandery was constituted by Sir Knight William McLean on December 5, 1871.
Baron No. 3 at Key West received a Dispensation on December 26, 1871, from Grand Master J. H. Hopkins, and was granted a Charter on December 3, 187 4.
Olivet No. 4 at Orlando received a Dispensation on March 17, 1887, from Grand Master Charles Roome, and was granted a Charter on October 10, 1889.
Palatka No. 5 at Palatka was granted a Dispensation on February 21, 1893, and Plant City No. 6 at Plant City on March 10, 1895, by Grand Master Hugh McCurdy.
Coeur de Lion No. 1, Damascus No. 2, and Olivet No. 4 petitioned the Grand Encampment for authority to form a Grand Commandery, and on August 1, 1895, Grand Master Hugh Mccurdy issued a warrant designating Sir Knight William McLean, Eminent Past Commander of Damascus No. 2, as his proxy to organize the Grand Commandery. Accordingly a Convention was held in Jacksonville and the Grand Commandery of Florida was established on August 15, 1895. Sir Knight William McLean was elected the first Grand Commander.
In 1948 there were 32 Commanderies and 4,410 members.2019-2,999

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GEORGIA

At the meeting of the Grand Encampment in 1826, it was reported that a Charter had been issued on May 5, 1823, for Georgia Encampment No. 1 at Augusta. At this same meeting it was reported that a Grand Encampment in Georgia had been formed with the approbation of the General Grand Officers. Nothing further was heard of either Georgia Encampment No. 1 or the Grand Encampment of Georgia until 1850 when Georgia Encampment sent a representative to the Triennial Conclave that year.
St. Omer No. 2 at Macon received a Dispensation from Sir Knight Joseph K. Stapleton, the Deputy General Grand Master, on July 26, 1848, and was granted a Charter on September 11, 1850. Sir Knight W. T. Gould, the General Grand Captain of the Guard, reported that he had constituted this Commandery on March 31, 1851.
St. Aldemar No. 3 at Columbus was formed under a Dispensation granted by Grand Master W. B. Hubbard on December 1, 1857. A Charter was granted September 16, 1859, and the Commandery was constituted by Sir Amos Benton on March 22, 1860.
Coeur de Lion No. 4 at Atlanta received a Dispensation from Grand Master W. B. Hubbard on May 14, 1859, and was granted a Charter on September 17, 1859. The Commandery was constituted March 19, 1860, by Sir Lemuel Lewelle.
By a resolution on September 16, 1859, the Grand Encampment approved the formation of a Grand Commandery in Georgia. A warrant was issued by Grand Master W. B. Hubbard on December 12, 1859, and the Grand Commandery of Georgia was constituted by Sir Knight Benjamin B. Russell, Eminent Commander of Georgia Commandery No. 1, as proxy of the Grand Master on April 25, 1860. William T. Gould was elected the first Grand Commander.
In 1948 there were 34 Commanderies and 8,088 members.2019-2,287

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HAWAII - August 14, 2012 www.yorkrite.org/hi/gckt

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IDAHO

On August 15, 1904, Grand Master H.
B. Stoddard commissioned Sir Knight James A. Pinney, Eminent Commander of Idaho Commandery No. 1, to constitute the Grand Commandery of Idaho at Boise.
This was duly carried out on August 31, 1904. Four Commanderies had been established in the state prior to that date .
Idaho No. 1 at Boise City received a Dispensation from Grand Master Benjamin Dean on May 24, 1882, and was granted a Charter on August 23, 1883.
Lewiston No . 2 at Lewiston received a Dispensation from Grand Master J . P. S. Gobin on August 20, 1891, and Moscow No. 3 at Moscow on August 26, 1891 .
Both received their Charter on August 11, 1892 .
Gate City No. 4 at Pocatello received a Dispensation from Grand Master Hugh Mccurdy on April 7, 1893, and was granted a Charter on August 29, 1895 .
In 1948 there were 14 Commanderies and 1,503 members.2019-238

ILLINOIS

The great opportunity for expansion of the Order in the Middle West was presented to the Grand Encampment by Sir Knight W. J. Reese in 1844. On May 5, 1845, Sir Knight Joseph K. Stapleton granted a Dispensation for Apollo No. 1 at Chicago. A Charter was granted on September 14, 1847 .
Belvedere No. 2 at Alton received a Dispensation from Grand Master W. B. Hubbard on March 25, 1853, and a Charter on September 19, 1853.
Central No. 3 at Decatur was granted a Dispensation by Grand Master W.B. Hubbard on July 22, 1856, but made no returns to the Grand Encampment at its Triennial Conclave in September 1856. At the next Triennial Meeting in September 1859, a resolution was adopted to extend the Dispensation of Central Commandery until the ensuing session of the newly formed Grand Commandery of 1 Illinois that they might take such action as was deemed necessary .
Peoria No. 4 at Peoria was granted a Dispensation by . Grand Master W. B. Hubbard on July.25, 1856, and received a Charter on September 15, 1856 .
Freeport No. 5 at Freeport was granted a Dispensation on June 10, 1857, and received a Charter on September 16, 1859.
On June 27, 1857, Grand Master W. B. Hubbard issued a warrant for the organization of the Grand Commandery of Illinois. A duplicate warrant was issued on September 15, 1857, and the Grand Commandery was organized on October 27, 1857. Sir James V. Z. Blaney was elected the first Grand Commander.
In 1948 there were 85 Commanderies and 17,000 members.2019-3,281

INDIANA

On April 24, 1854, Grand Master W. B. Hubbard issued a warrant authorizing the formation of the Grand Commandery of Indiana. It was constituted on May 16, 1854, and Sir Knight Henry C. Lawrence was elected the first Grand Commander. There were four Subordinate Commanderies. All had received their Dispensations from Grand Master Hubbard.
Raper No. 1 at Indianapolis received a Dispensation on May 14, 1848, and a Charter on September 11, 1850.
Greensburg No. 2 at Greensburg received a Dispensation on January 25, 1851, and a Charter on September 19, 1853.
Lafayette No. 3 at Lafayette received a Dispensation on April 2, 1852, and a Charter on September 16, 1853 .
Fort Wayne No. 4 at Fort Wayne received a Dispensation on May 13, 1853, and a Charter on September 16, 1853.
In 1948 there were 60 Commanderies and 11,339 members.2019-2,827

IOWA
The first Commandery in Iowa was DeMolay No . 1 at Muscatine. The Dispensation was granted on March 14, 1855, and a Charter was issued on September 10, 1856.
Palestine No. 2 at Iowa City petitioned the Grand Master, but objection was raised by DeMolay No. 1 as the two cities were only thirty-two miles apart. The petition was referred to the Grand Encampment for action, and a Charter was granted at once, without a previous Dispensation, on September 15, 1856.
Siloam No. 3 at Dubuque was granted a Dispensation by Grand Master W. B. Hubbard on February 9, 1857, and received a Charter on September 16, 1859 . The Commandery was constituted in October 14, 1859, by Sir Knight Theodore S. Parvin.
Des Moines No. 4 at Des Moines received a Dispensation on July 10, 1857. The Dispensation was renewed September 19, 1859. At the meeting in 1862 it was reported that no returns or dues had been received since its organization. There is no record of a Charter being granted.
Damascus No. 5 at Keokuk was granted a Dispensation by Grand Master B. B. French on December 15, 1863 , but due to the fact that the Grand Commandery of Iowa had been given authority to organize on October 27, 1863, the fee paid to the Grand Encampment was refunded and the matter referred to the Grand Commander of Iowa to take up after its organization.
The Grand Commandery of Iowa received a warrant from Grand Master B. B. French on October 27, 1863, and was constituted on June 6, 1864, by Sir Knight James R. Hartsock as proxy for the Grand Master. Sir Theodore S. Parvin was chosen as the first Grand Commander.
In 1948 there were 62 Commanderies and 7,821 members.2019-1,278

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KANSAS

On October 21, 1868, representatives of the four Commanderies in Kansas met at Lawrence, and framed a petition to the Grand Master for authority to organize a Grand Commandery in Kansas. This warrant was granted by Grand Master W. S. Gardner on December 2, 1868, and the Grand Commandery was constituted on December 29, 1868, by Sir Knight Owen A. Bassett, acting as the proxy of the Grand Master. Sir Knight William O. Gould was elected the first Grand Commander.
Leavenworth No. 1 at Leavenworth was granted a Dispensation by Grand Master B. B. French on February 10, 1864, and a Charter on September 6, 1865.
Washington No . 2 at Atchison was granted a Dispensation by Grand Master B. B. French on June 5, 1865, and a Charter on September 6, 1865.
Hugh de Payen No. 3 at Ft. Scott was granted a Dispensation by Grand Master H. L. Palmer on April 13, 1867, and a Charter on September 18, 1968.
DeMolay No. 4 at Lawrence was granted a Dispensation by Grand Master H. L. Palmer on March 10, 1868, and a Charter on September 18, 18 68.
In 1848 there were 58 Commanderies and 9,926 members.2019-987

KENTUCKY

At the meeting of the Grand Encampment in 1826, it was reported that Webb No. 1 at Lexington, Kentucky, had been granted a Charter by Sir Knight John Snow, the General Grand Generalissimo, on January 1, 1826. The Commandery became dormant and was revived by a Dispensation granted by Grand Master James Allen on March 20, 1841.
Louisville No. 2 at Louisville was granted a Dispensation by Grand Master J. Allen on January 2, 1840, and a Charter on September 17, 1841 .
Versailles No. 3 at Versailles was granted a Dispensation by the General Grand Generalissimo, W. J. Reese, on April 26, 1842, and a Charter on September 12, 1844.
At the meeting of the Grand Encampment in 1847, Joseph K. Stapleton, the Deputy General Grand Master, reported that he had granted a Dispensation to a number of Commanderies, among them being Frankfort No. 4 at Frankfort, Kentucky. No date is given for the Dispensation. The Charter was granted on September 16, 1847. The same is true of Montgomery No. 5 at Mt. Sterling . The Charter was granted September 16, 1847. On September 15, 1847, the first three Commanderies petitioned the Grand Encampment for permission to form a Grand Commandery, which was granted on September 16, 1847. A resolution was made to join Frankfort No. 4 and Montgomery No. 5 with the others in this petition but it was rejected. The Grand Commandery of Kentucky was constituted on October 15, 1847, and Sir Knight Henry Wingate was elected the first Grand Master.
In 1948 there were 39 Commanderies and 7,003 members.2019-2,224

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LOUISIANA

At the meeting of the Grand Encampment on September 15, 1829, it was reported that the Deputy General Grand Master, Sir Jonathan Nye, had granted a Charter for an Encampment in New Orleans to be known as the Encampment of invincible. No date is given for the Charter which was issued sometime after the Triennial Meeting in 1826. This Commandery was represented by Sir Alexander E. McConnell, who was elected General Grand Standard Bearer in 1829, and advanced to General Grand Warder in 1832 . Nothing further is known of this Commandery .
The Grand Encampment of New York on May 4, 1816, issued its second warrant to a body of "Knights Templar, Royal Arch Masons and members of the Sovereign Grand Council of Princes of the Royal Secret of Louisiana sitting at New Orleans." The warrant bears the signature of DeWitt Clinton as Grand Master. The title was "Louisiana Encampment No. 6" which was later changed to Indivisible Friends. At the meeting of the General Grand Encampment in 1838, it was reported that the Grand Encampment of New York had transferred jurisdiction of this body to the General Grand Encampment of the U.S., which was accepted, and Indivisible Friends Encampment was notified to make returns direct to the General Grand Encampment. At the formation of the Grand Commandery of Louisiana it became Indivisible Friends No. 1.
Jacques DeMolay No. 2 at New Orleans was granted a Dispensation by Deputy General Grand Master Joseph K. Stapleton on April 18, 1850. This Dispensation was continued on September 12, 1850, until proper returns were made when a Charter was granted on April 25, 1851.
Orleans No. 3 at New Orleans was granted a Dispensation by Grand Master B. B. French on May 19, 1860, and a charter on September 3, 1862. Sir John Q. A. Fellows was designated as Eminent Commander. Jacques DeMolay No. 2 and Orleans No. 3 consolidated in 1885.
On January 25, 1864, these three Commanderies petitioned Grand Master French for permission to form a Grand Commandery. A warrant was issued the same date and the Grand Commandery of Louisiana was constituted on February 12, 1864, by Sir Knight John H. Holland as proxy for the Grand Master. Sir Knight Henry R. Swasey was elected the first Grand Commander.
In 1948 there were 15 Commanderies and 2,225 members.2019-1,125

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MAINE

On August 23, 1805, a Council of Knights of the Red Cross was established at Portland under authority of the Grand Encampment of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. In 1820 Darius Council petitioned Henry Fowle for authority to form an Encampment which he granted and a Charter was issued on March 17, 1821, to Maine Encampment No. 1. It was active until 1829, and then became dormant until 1845. In the Register of Encampments in the General Grand Encampment Proceedings of 1847 and 1850, Maine Encampment No. 1 is listed, but there is nothing in the Proceedings to show when recognition was given by the Grand Encampment.
Portland No. 2 at Portland was granted a Dispensation by Joseph K. Stapleton sometime between 1844 and 1847, as he reported this action to the Grand Encampment in 1847. In the list of Subordinate Commanderies, published in the Proceedings of 1886, the date of Dispensation is given as April 30, 1846. A Charter was granted September 16, 1847. St. Johns No. 3 at Bangor was granted a Dispensation by the General Grand Captain General, Chas. W. Moore, some­ time between 1847 and 1850. The date given in the list of 1886 is February 18, 1850. A Charter was granted September 11, 1850.
In 1853, W. H. Ellis, the Deputy General Grand Master, reported that in January 1851 he had given approval for the formation of a Grand Commandery in Maine. It was constituted on May 5, 1852. Charles B. Smith of Portland was elected first Grand Commander.
In 1948 there were 24 Commanderies and 6,108 members.2019-1,328

MARYLAND

Maryland Commandery No. 1 has an interesting history. Claims have been made of the conferring of the Orders of Knighthood by this body as early as 1790. However, Schultz (117) could find no records to prove its existence beyond 1802. A diploma, dated January 16, 1802, shows Encampment No. 1 acting under the sanction of Washington Lodge No. 3. Webb (136) in his Monitor of 1805, lists three Encampments in Mary­ land: No. 3 and No. 13 in Baltimore and No. 24 in Havre de Grace. The latter two soon ceased work, but No. 3 continued, and as early as 1812 is shown by another diploma to have severed its connection with Washington Lodge No. 3 and was known as Maryland Encampment No. 1. Creigh (29) in his "History of Knights Templar in Pennsylvania" reports that Encampment No. 1 of Baltimore was represented at the organization meeting of the Grand Encampment of Pennsylvania on February 15, 1814. Sir Knight Henry S. Keatinge, the delegate, was elected Grand Standard Bearer. A Charter of Recognition was granted Maryland Encampment No. by the Grand Encampment of Pennsylvania on May 2, 1814. While the Grand Encampment of Pennsylvania became dormant, Maryland Encampment No. 1 continued active, and on February 28, 1828, had a reorganization meeting. Philip Eckel was elected Grand Master and Joseph K. Stapleton, Generalissimo . On October 30, 1832, Sir Knights Keatinge, Stapleton and Keyser were appointed delegates to attend the Grand Encampment Meeting on November 29, 1832. The Grand Encampment reported in favor of the admission of Maryland Encampment, and on December 8, 1832, the old Pennsylvania Charter of Recognition was so endorsed. Baltimore No. 2 at Baltimore received a Dispensation from Grand Master Wm. B. Hubbard on June 17, 1859, and a Charter on September 16, 1859. This Commandery was constituted by G.M. Benj. B. French on October 19, 1859.
Monumental No. 3 at Baltimore received o a Dispensation from Grand Master H. L. Palmer on May 3, 1866, arid a Charter on September 18, 1868.
Jacques DeMolay No. 4 at Frederick received a Dispensation from Grand Master Henry L. Palmer on November 23, 1867, and a Charter on September 18, 1868.
Crusade No. 5 at Baltimore received a Dispensation from Grand Master W. S. Gardner on March 29, 1869. Its Charter was issued by the Grand Commandery of Maryland on May 10, 1871. On December 12, 1870, a Convention was held in Baltimore with representatives from the first three Commanderies. A request for a warrant was sent to Grand Master W. S. Gardner, who issued the same on January 3, 1871. The Grand Commandery of Maryland was constituted on January 23, 1871, by Sir Knight Jeremiah L. Hutchinson, proxy for the Grand Master. Sir Charles H. Mann was elected the first Grand Commander.
In 1948 there were 13 Commanderies and 4,045 members.2019-1,033

MASSACHUSETTS & RHODE ISLAND
St. John's Encampment at Providence, R.I., was organized on August 23, 1802, with Sir Thomas Smith Webb as Grand Master. On May 6, 1805, a Convention of Knights Templar was held in Providence, and Webb and his friends proceeded to organize a State Grand Encampment. This established the "Grand Encampment of Rhode Island and Jurisdictions there­ unto belonging." Sir Knight Webb was chosen as General Grand Master. At an extra assembly held on October 7, 1805, an application for a Charter from St. Johns Encampment was received and the Charter was granted.
Records show the conferring of the Orders of Knighthood in Boston as early as 1767 . About November 1794, Benjamin Hurd organized a Council of Red Cross in Boston. In 1802, Henry Fowle and nine other Sir Knights formed Boston Encampment of Knights of the Red Cross. This organization dissolved, and Boston Encampment of Knights Templar was immediately formed on December 21, 1805. Application was made to the Grand Encampment of Rhode Island for a Charter, which was granted on March 3, 1806. In 1806, action was taken to have the Encampment at Newburyport, Massachusetts, join with the Grand Encampment. This Encampment had been formed about 1795. Evidently the invitation (that] was accepted for Newburyport Encampment was represented at the meeting of the Grand Encampment in 1807.
Darius Council at Portland, Maine, established in 1805, received a Charter from the Grand Encampment of Massachusetts and Rhode Island, dated May 29, 1806.
In 1814, an Encampment was formed at Newport, the Sir Knights receiving the Orders through Columbian Encampment in New York. On June 7, 1814, a petition was presented to the Grand Encampment of Rhode Island and a Charter was granted on June 26, 1815, for an Encampment to be known as Washington Encampment.
In 1807 the name of the Grand Encampment of Rhode Island was changed to the United States Encampment. In 1816 the old name was resumed and later became the Grand Encampment of Massachusetts and Rhode Island.
This Grand Encampment, through its delegates, assisted in the formation of the General Grand Encampment in June 1816, and gave its allegiance to that body.
In 1948 there were 51 Commanderies and 12,916 members.2019-2,107

MICHIGAN

On February 13, 1857,Grand Master
W. B. Hubbard issued a warrant authorizing the formation of the Grand Commandery of Michigan. It was constituted on April 7, 1857. Sir Knight John Gilbert was elected first Grand Commander. On January 11, 1858, Grand Master Hubbard visited the Grand Commandery at its Conclave in Detroit and installed its Officers.
Detroit No. 1 at Detroit received a Dispensation on November 1, 1850, and a Charter on September 19, 1853.
Pontiac No. 2 at Pontiac received a Dispensation on . M arch 25, 1852, and a Charter on September 19, 1853.
Eureka No. 3 at Hillsdale received a Dispensation on February 13, 1854, and a Charter on September 10, 185 6.
Peninsular No. 4 at Kalamazoo received a Dispensation on March 3, 1856 , and a Charter on September 10, 1856. At first, Peninsular No . 4 declined to recognize the new Grand Commandery of Michigan and made returns and paid dues to the Grand Encampment until 1859, when it was ruled that when a State Grand Commandery is formed it is the duty of each Subordinate Commandery in that jurisdiction to enroll under the new Grand Commandery. Peninsular Commandery then applied for a Charter from the Grand Commandery of Michigan, which was granted at a Special Conclave on January 11, 1860.
Monroe No. 5 at Monroe received a Dispensation on March 29, 1856, and a Charter on September 11, 1856.
DeMolay No. 6 at Grand Rapids received a Dispensation on May 9, 18 56, and a Charter on September 10, 1856.
In 1948 there were 53 Commanderies and 11,676 members .2019-1,620

MINNESOTA

The Grand Commandery of Minnesota was organized on October 23, 1865. Sir Knight George W. Prescott was elected the first Grand Commander.
Damascus No. 1 at St. Paul was granted a Dispensation by Grand Master W. B. Hubb and on July 8, 1856, and received a Charter on September 10, 1856.
The next three Commanderies received Dispensations from Grand Master B. B. French and were granted Charters on September 6, 1865:
 Zion No. 2 at Minneapolis, Dispensation on May 19, 1863.
Coeur de Lion No. 3 at Winona, Dispensation on May 13, 1864 .
Mankato No. 4 at Mankato, Dispensation on April 5, 1865.
In 1948 there were 36 Commanderies and 7,939 members.2019-1,068

MISSISSIPPI

On December 5, 1856, Grand Master
W. B. Hubbard issued a warrant authorizing the formation of the Grand Commandery of Mississippi. A duplicate was issued on December 22, 1856, and the Grand Commandery was constituted on January 21, 1857. Sir Knight William H. Stevens was elected as the first Grand Commander.
Mississippi No. 1 at Jackson received a Dispensation from Joseph K. Stapleton on July 5, 1844, and a Charter on Septem­ber 12 ; 1844.
Magnolia No. 2 at Vicksburg received a Dispensation from Grand Master W. B. Hubbard on October 2, 1850, and a Charter on September 19, 1853.
Lexington No. 3 at Lexington received a Dispensation from Grand Master W. B. Hubbard on July 23, 1856, and a Charter on September 11 , 1856 .
In 1948 there were 25 Commanderies and 3,842 members.2019-1,493

MISSOURI

At the meeting of the Grand Encampment in 1847, a petition was presented from a number of Sir Knights in St. Louis.
A Charter was granted in September 17, 1847, to St. Louis Encampment No. 1.
Weston No. 2 at Weston received a Dispensation from Grand Master W. B. Hubbard on March 4, 1853, and a Charter on September 19, 1853.Member 2019-1,841

MONTANA-May 14, 1888. www.mtyorkrite.org/gckt

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NEBRASKA-December 27, 1871

NEVADA-April 15, 1918

NEW HAMPSHIRE-June 13, 1826

NEW JERSEY- February 14, 1860

NEW MEXICO-August 21, 1901

August 21, 1901 saw the several initial New Mexico Commanderies form the Grand Commandery of New Mexico. These included:
Santa Fe Commandery No. 1
Las Vegas Commandery No. 2
Pilgrim Commandery No. 3
McGrorty Commandery No. 4
Aztec Commandery No. 5
Rio Hondo Commandery no. 6
This was celebrated by holding the first Conclave of the Grand Commandery on that date. The first Annual Conclave was held later in October of 1901 in Albuquerque. Past Eminent Commander Edward L. Bartlett of Santa Fe represented the Grand Master, Most Worshipful Brother Reuben H. Lloyd, and convened the Grand Conclave. A Constitution, Bylaws, and Rules of the Order were adopted and an election of Grand Commandery Officers was held under it. Sir Knight Bartlett was elected the first Grand Commander of New Mexico.

NEW YORK

In colonial days, New York City was the starting point for Masonry in the State of New York. Establishing a definite starting date for Freemasonry in the colony of New York is extremely difficult. The craft had been in existence for many years prior to the formation of the Mother Grand Lodge in London in the year 1717. Undoubtedly many brethren at the time had received degrees in the British Isles or Europe and immigrated to America. The first authentic record we find is the appointment of Daniel Coxe as Provincial Grand Master of New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania by the Duke of Norfolk, June 5, 1730. In view of this appointment it is fair to presume that Freemasons were active in the Colony of New York. The first regular Lodge of which there is a record is St. John No. 2 (now No. 1) warranted December 7, 1757. The fact that it was given No.2 would indicate an earlier Lodge prior to 1757.The first newspaper reference to Freemasonry in New York appeared in the Independent Journal, Wednesday, December 28, 1785, reporting the anniversary celebration of the feast of St. John, the Evangelist. The article also states that the Knights Templar formed the escort for the Grand Lodge. From this we note that the Order of Knights Templar had been established in the Colony of New York and was a member of the Masonic family, the exact date of the first Encampment is unknown. There are many divergent theories regarding the origin of the present Order of Knights Templar. We find that the degree of Knights Templar was conferred under the control of Symbolic Lodges in Scotland, England, and Ireland in the early part of the eighteenth century. An interesting item appears in the proceedings of the Great Priory of England and Wales for the year 1941 page
1791
That on the 2th June, 1791, in London, was held the first general representative meeting of Masonic Knights Templar of England and that, therefore, I n the next month will fall the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the foundation of Great Priory. It is hoped that after the war a special meeting of official recognition of this will be held, when a short history of the Order during the last 150 years will be published. Some of these early Templars found their way to America either as soldiers or immigrants and when sufficient number assembled they assumed the authority to organize an Encampment. Each was absolutely independent, recognizing no supreme authority, because, in fact non existed at the time.
1814
In 1814 it became apparent that some control must be exercised, and the Grand Encampment of New York was formed. The preliminary meeting was held in New York, January 22, 1814. Elias Hicks, the first Grand Orator, outlined the purpose of the meeting as follows: A longer continuance of this state of things could be but productive of ill consequences, inasmuch as it was to be apprehended that these sorts of un-constituted associations, so rapidly increasing in numbers, would, sooner or later have lessened, if not entirely destroyed the commanding respect due to so dignified a degree as that of Knights Templar. Accordingly, the Sovereign Grand Consistory of Chiefs of Exalted Masonry fully impressed with the necessity and importance of this subject has at its session of the 22nd day of January A.D. 1814, as aforesaid, decreed by a unanimous vote, the establishment of a Grand Encampment of Sir Knights Templars and Appendant Orders for the State of New York. The first regular meeting was held in New York, June 18, 1814, at which time they ratified the action of the preliminary meeting on January 22nd, and elected DeWitt Clinton as Thrice Illustrious Grand Master. He was re-elected at each succeeding Annual Meeting until his death in 1828.DeWitt Clinton was a distinguished citizen of New York, prominent in the civil and political life of the State. The demand upon his time prevented his personal attendance at the meeting of the Grand Encampment. The only meeting over which he presided during his fourteen years as Grand Master, was in St. Johns Hall, New York, June 9, 1826.It is evident from the titles used, that the founders of the Grand Encampment were Scottish Rite Masons. They are referred to as the “Grand Consistory of the Chiefs of Exalted Masonry.” The title of the presiding officer was ‘Thrice Illustrious Grand Master” and the meeting place was the "Valley of New York "The Constitution adopted June 25, 1814, Article One, Section Three, read as follows: The Thrice Ill. Grand Master of the Grand Encampment, as soon as may be after his election, shall be admitted, gratis, a member of the Supreme Council of Grand Inspectors General, should he not belong to that Supreme Body. Section 4 of Article One provided that the Grand Master of Subordinate Encampments be made32nd degree Masons under the same conditions. In 1823 the word “Illustrious” is eliminated from he title, but the records do not relate as to the reason for the change. From this date there is no reference to the Scottish Rite. The Annual Meetings from 1814 to 1852, inclusive were held in New York City. The meeting place was Masonic Hall, 55 Nassau St. and later the Howard House in 1837.In 1814 a number of Encampments were operating in New York City and the Hudson Valley but due to the lack of definite information it is impossible to determine who they were. Thomas Smith Webb in his Freemasons Monitor, published in 1816, page 246 mentions four as follows: The Old Encampment – City of New York Jerusalem Encampment – City of New York Montgomery Encampment – Stillwater Temple Encampment – Albany The list is incomplete and inaccurate according to the historical record published by Robert Macoy, Grand Recorder of New York on the Proceedings for 1882, pages 118 -121, in which the following was reported: Old Encampment – sometimes called Grand Encampment or Morton Encampment – New York City St.. Peters Encampment – New York City Rising Sun Encampment, No.1 – New York City Encampments at Albany- Montgomery, Stillwater, Salem and Granville In the minutes of the Grand Encampment of the United States, June 20, 1816, the name of Ancient Encampment of New York, a name not appearing in New York records, and there is no record in New York of Jerusalem reported by Webb. Macoy cites as the source of his historical data, a perfect set of city directories from the year1785. He is of the opinion that the Templars referred to in the newspaper item of 1785 were of Morton Encampment, sometimes known as Old Encampment or Grand Encampment. The first published list of officers in the city directory for 1796 shows Jacob Morton as Grand Master. There is no record after 1810. At the Annual Conclave, May 22, 1815, Jacob Morton was elected an honorary member of Grand Encampment; St. Peters Encampment was organized prior to1700, as the city directory of that date shows a list of officers with John West as Grand Master, No record after 1801.Rising Sun Encampment, No. 1, the only early Encampment to bear that a number, was the most prominent of the period. The date of origin is unknown; except that it was founded in the early part of the nineteenth century, by a number of Sir Knights of the R.S.H., R.A.C. Macoy says the signification of these initials we are unable to give. It would appear, however, that they referred to Rising Sun Royal Arch Chapter. Then Encampment was represented at a meeting in Philadelphia, PA, February 15, 1814 called for the purpose of organizing a Grand Encampment in Pennsylvania. A charter of recognition was granted Pennsylvania, May 13, 1814. Macoy says they conferred the degrees of Ark, Mark, Mediterranean Pass, Red Cross, Knight Templar and Malta.

NORTH CAROLINA--May 10, 1881

NEW DAKOTA-June 16, 1890

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OHIO-October 24, 1843.

The history of the Grand Commandery of Knights Templar of the state of Ohio began on the 14th day of March in 1818 when John Snow, at his home on North High Street in Worthington received a dispensation to form the first Commandery of Knights Templar East of the Appalachian Mountains. It was issued by Thomas Smith Webb, who was at that time serving as Deputy General Grand Master of the General Grand Encampment of Knight Templars of the United States of America and was credited with being the father of the American system of the York Rite of Freemasonry. He was a business associate of John Snow and visited often in the Snow home.
On the following day, 15 March 1818, Sir Knight John Snow summoned all Sir Knights living within “the distance of forty miles” to assemble in the Masonic Hall at Worthington. Those present were Thomas Smith Webb, hailing from the General Grand Encampment and the Grand Encampment of Massachusetts and Rhode Island, John Snow, hailing from St John’s Encampment of Rhode Island, and Frederick Curtis, hailing from Ireland. After opening a Council of Red Cross Knights, James Kilbourne and Chester Griswold were elected, created and dubbed Knights of the Red Cross. Thus began the history of Mt Vernon Commandery No.1 and the Order of Knights Templar in Ohio. Griswold was the first to be dubbed and created a Knight of the Valiant and Magnanimous Order of the Temple and the Knights of Malta of the Order of St John of Jerusalem. Kilbourne and Griswold were prominent citizens of Worthington. On September 16, 1819, Mt Vernon Encampment was issued its Charter.
Seventeen years later, December 16, 1835, the General Grand Encampment issued a charter to Lancaster Encampment No. 2. William J. Reese and George Sanderson were the first petitioners. Sir Knight Reese served as the first Eminent Commander and became one of its most prominent members.
Six years later, September 17, 1841, a charter was issued to Cincinnati Encampment No.3. Sir Knight and Reverend Robert J. Punshon was the first Eminent Commander. He went on to become an influential member in the Grand Encampment of Ohio.
Two years later, July 5, 1843, Sir Knight William J. Reese, who was serving as the Grand Captain General of the General Grand Encampment of the USA, issued a dispensation to institute an Encampment at Massillon. This became Massillon Encampment No.4. Sir Knight George D. Hine was its first Eminent Commander. He later became an Officer in the Grand Encampment of Ohio.
A few days later, July 22, 1843, a dispensation was issued to Sir Knight and Reverend Joseph Muenscher and others to institute an Encampment of Knights Templar at Mt Vernon. It became known as Clinton Encampment No. 5.
The stage was now prepared for the formation of the Grand Encampment of Knights Templar of Ohio. On October 24, 1843, in the Old Market House Building at Lancaster, and on the recommendation of Sir Knight William J. Reese, Right Eminent Grand Generalissimo of the General Grand Encampment of Knights Templar of the U S A, a Conclave of Knights Templar was opened for the purpose of forming a Grand Encampment of Knights Templar for the State of Ohio. After reading a Warrant from the General Grand Encampment of the USA, the Grand Encampment of Knights Templar of Ohio was declared instituted.
Thus the Grand Encampment of Knights Templar of the State of Ohio had its birth. The First Officers elected were M.Z. Kreider of Lancaster as Grand Master; G.D. Hines of Massillon, Deputy Grand Master; Isaac C. Copelen, of Cincinnati as Grand Generalissimo; J.N. Burr of Mt Vernon, as Grand Captain General; John Barney of Worthington, as Grand Prelate; John Evans of Cincinnati, as Grand Senior Warden; Kimball Porter of Wooster, as Grand Junior Warden; A.D. Bigelow of Newark as Grand Treasurer; B.F. Smith of Mt Vernon as Grand Recorder; B. Latham of Columbus as Grand Standard Bearer; Ezra Griswold of Delaware as Grand Sword Bearer; J.P. Worstell of Massillon as Grand Warder; and Rev Robert Punshon of Cincinnati, as Chaplain.
The Grand Encampment of Knights Templar of Ohio was renamed the Grand Commandery of Knights Templar of Ohio at the 25th Conclave held at Cincinnati in 1867. Encampments were renamed Commanderies The General Grand Encampment retained its name as the administrative body of the Templar Masonry. The Grand Master of Ohio became the Grand Commander with the honorary title of “ Right Eminent Grand Commander.”
By 1869 the ranks of the Sir Knights in the Grand Commandery of Ohio had grown to 1,642. By 1879 it had grown to more than 3,000 belonging to 34 Commanderies. In 1882 the Grand Commandery began Annual Inspections of each Commandery. In 1892 the Grand Commandey adopted the Ritual as approved by the Grand Encampment and thus standardized the Ritual of the Orders. Originally the sequence of conferral was the Order of Red Cross, Order of the Temple and lastly the Order of Malta. This was changed in 1916 to establish the Order of The Temple as the predominate Order of the Templars.
In 1916 the membership of the Grand Commandery was 18,704. In 1928, the membership had soared to 34,266. Of the 84 original Commanderies, 83 are still functioning with Jerusalem No. 75 Chartered in 2001 and Covert No.43 chartered 2003.

OKLAHOMA
Following the admission of Oklahoma as a state in November 1907, the present Grand Commandery of Oklahoma was formed by a consolidation of the Grand Commanderies already existing in Indian Territory and in the Territory of Oklahoma. Both Grand Commanderies were of recent origin and were active and flourishing. The Grand Commandery of Oklahoma had 17 subordinate Commanderies with 915 members and the Grand Commandery of Indian Territory had seven subordinate Commanderies and 417 members. After much planning and effort the merger was affected. A personal visit of Grand Master H. W. Rugg in 1908, followed by a visit of Grand Master W. B. Melish in 1911, were helpful in bringing about the consolidation which occurred on October 6, 1911.
The Grand Commandery of Indian Territory was granted a warrant by Grand Master La Rue Thomas on December 17, 1895. Sir William H. Mayo was designated as proxy of the Grand Master. The Grand Commandery was constituted on December 27, 1895. Sir Knight Robert W. Hill was chosen as the first Grand Commander. There were three subordinate Commanderies.
Muskogee No . 1 at Muskogee received a Dispensation from Grand Master J. P. S. Gobin on October 1, 1891, and was granted a Charter on August 11, 1892.
Chickasaw No. 2 at Purcell received a Dispensation from Grand Master Hugh McCurdy on May 31, 1894, and was granted a Charter on August 29, 1895.
McAlester No. 3 at McAlester received a Dispensation from Grand Master Hugh McCurdy on July 14, 1894, and was gran­ ted a Charter on August 29, 1895.
The Grand Commandery of Oklahoma Territory was granted a warrant on Nov­ ember 8, 1895, by Grand Master W. L. Thomas. The Grand Commandery was constituted on February 10 , 1896, by Sir Knight Cassius McDonald Barnes, proxy for the Grand Master. He was elected as the first Grand Commander. There were three subordinate Commanderies.
Guthrie No . 1 at Guthrie received a Dispensation from Grand Master J. P. S. Gobin on July 12, 1890, and was granted a Charter on August 11 , 1892 .
Oklahoma No. 2 at Oklahoma City received a Dispensation from Grand Master J. P. S. Gobin on March 5, 1892, and was granted a Charter on August 11, 1892 .
Ascension No . 3 at El Reno received a Dispensation from Grand Master H. McCurdy on May 8, 1893, and was granted a Charter on August 29, 1895.
In 1948 there were 34 Commanderies and 4,606 members.2019-1,321

OREGON

At the Triennial Conclave in 1862 Grand Master B. B. French reported that he had granted a special Dispensation on March 19, 1860, to five Sir Knights at Oregon City to open a Commandery and create sufficient Sir Knights to constitute a regular Commandery. This was done and a constitutional petition was presented . On July 24, 1860, he issued a Dispensation for Oregon Commandery No. 1 at Oregon City. It soon became dormant.
Oregon Commandery No. 1 at Portland was formed under similar conditions. Three Sir Knights petitioned Grand Master James H. Hopkins for a Special Dispensation to hold a meeting with the indispensable number of Sir Knights present to create a sufficient number of Sir Knights that a petition in regular form could be presented. On September 22, 1875, Grand Master J. H. Hopkins issued the Special Dispensation, and on December 20, 1875, the meeting was opened. On December 22, nine Companions received the Order of the Temple. A regular petition was prepared on December 23, 1875, and on February 15, 1876, Grand Master J . H. Hopkins issued a regular Dispensation for Oregon Commandery to be held in Portland. A Charter was granted on August 30, 1877.
Ivanhoe No. 2 at Eugene City received a Dispensation from Grand Master Benj. Dean on April 6, 1883, and was granted a Charter on August 23, 1883.
Temple No. 3 at Albany received a Dispensation from Acting Grand Master Charles Roome on June 5, 1886, and was granted a Charter on September 24, 1886.
On February 25, 1887 , representatives of these three Commanderies presented a petition to Grand Master Charles Roome who issued a warrant designating Sir Knight Irving W. Pratt as his proxy. The Grand Commandery of Oregon was constituted on April 13, 1887 . Sir Knight James F. Robinson was elected the first Grand Commander.
In 1948 there were 21 Commanderies and 4,311 members.2019-534

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PENNSYLVANIA

On May 12, 1897, a Convention was held in Philadelphia, and a Grand Encampment for Pennsylvania was organized by representatives of four Encampments then in existence in that state. These were under the authority of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania. The exact date of the organization of these Encampments is not known. Creigh (29) in his "History of Knights Templar of Pennsylvania" gives it between 1793 and 1797 . The four Encampments were: Philadelphia Encampment No. 1, Philadelphia No. 2, Harrisburg No. 3, and Carlisle No . 4. There are no records of this Convention or of any subsequent meetings of any were held. From all evidence, it seems likely that this body soon became dormant. On December 27 , 1812, Philadelphia Encampment No. 2 consolidated with Philadelphia No. 1.
On February 16, 1814, a Convention was held in Philadelphia for the purpose of organizing a second Grand Encampment. Delegates were present from Philadelphia, No. 1, Pittsburgh No. 2 (established February 2, 1814, under a warrant from Lodge No. 35), Rising Sun Encampment No. 1 of New York (established on March 14, 1808), Washington Encampment No. 1 of Wilmington, Delaware, and Encampment No. 1 of Baltimore, Maryland . Washington Encampment No. 1 and Maryland No. 1 and Rising Sun Encampment No. 1 received Charters from the newly organized Grand Encampment of Pennsylvania soon after the Convention in 1814 .
The representatives of this second Grand Encampment met with delegates from the Grand Encampment of Massachusetts & Rhode Island and of New York in 1816 to form a General Grand Encampment As noted previously this Convention failed in its purpose. This second Grand Encampment became dor­mant in 1824.
St. Johns Encampment No. 4 (established on June 8, 1819) was the only survivor of this Grand Encampment, although it was not active for many years. St. Johns Encampment continued under the authority of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania until February 12, 1857.
According to Creigh (29) Holy and Undivided Trinity Encampment at Harris­ burg was organized on November 22, 1826, by a Dispensation issued by General Grand Master DeWitt Clinton. As the fourth Triennial Meeting of the General Grand Encampment did not take place until 1829, and Sir Knight Clinton having died just before the meeting, no report on this Encampment was made and no Charter was issued.
In 1846, there was a revival of St. Johns Encampment No. 4 and the establishment of a number of others under the Grand Lodge, namely: Philadelphia No. 5, Vernon No. 6 in Philadelphia, and DeMolay in Reading. Representatives of these four Encampments met in Philadelphia on May 10, 1854, and organized the third Grand Encampment of Pennsylvania. Attention was called to these Encampments at several meetings of the General Grand Encampment and they were declared illegal because such a revival was not considered regular after so many years of inactivity.
 In the meantime, four Encampments had been established by the General Grand Encampment. Pittsburgh No. 1 at Pittsburgh received a Dispensation from Grand Master W. B. Hubbard on May 13, 1846, and was granted a Charter on September 16, 1847. Jacques de Molay No. 2 at Washington received a Dispensation on September 12, 1849, which was continued at the meeting of the Grand Encampment on September 13, 1850. The Charter was granted by the Grand Master on October 24, 1850.
St. Omer No. 3 at Uniontown presented a petition to the Grand Encampment at its meeting in 1853 and received a Charter on September 19, 1853. No Dispensation was issued. Hubbard No . 4 at Waynesburg received a Dispensation from Grand Master W. B. Hubbard on November 10, 1851, which was continued at the meeting of the Grand Encampment on September 19, 1853. A Charter was granted on September 12, 1856.
Representatives of the first three of these Encampments met in Brownsville on April 12, 1854, to organize the Grand Encampment of Pennsylvania on the authority of a warrant issued by Grand Master W. B. Hubbard on February 18, 1854 .
On February 12, 1857, members of the committees from the two Grand Encampments claiming jurisdiction in Pennsylvania assembled in the Masonic Temple in Philadelphia and all the Encampments were united under the Grand Commandery of Pennsylvania. On June, 1857,Sir Knight William W. Wilson of the Grand Commandery proclaimed the ratification of this action which was also proclaimed by Grand Master Hubbard on June 20, 1857.
By this action eleven Commanderies were added to the four previously established by the Grand Encampment.
In 1948 there were 93 Commanderies and 24,899 members.2019-4,109

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SOUTH CAROLINA

From the McPherson diploma of 1782 and the Beaumont diploma of 1783, it is evident that organized bodies were conferring the Orders of Knighthood in Charleston, South Carolina, on or before those dates. It is the opinion of Sir Albert Mackey that South Carolina Encampment No. 1 derived its authority from the Supreme Council of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite about 1803 and continued under this authority or as an independent body until 1823.
At the meeting of the General Grand Encampment on September 19, 1826, it was reported a Charter of Recognition had been granted to South Carolina Encampment at Charleston on September 23, 1823, by Sir John Snow,theGeneral Grand Generalissimo, and a Charter of Recognition to Columbia Encampment at Columbia on January 24, 1824, by Sir Henry Fowle, Deputy General Grand Master. Columbia Encampment is said to have been established by a warrant issued October 2, 1821, by the Grand Encampment of Pennsylvania. A Charter for a new Encampment at Georgetown called La Fayette was granted March 1825 by Sir Henry Fowle. At this same meeting, the organization of the Grand Encampment for South Carolina received the approbation of the General Grand Officers. Their representative was James Egland, who also attended the meeting in 1829 when he was elected General Grand Captain General. Beaufort Encampment No. 4 was chartered by the Grand Encampment of South Carolina in 1827. By 1830, Columbia No. 2, Lafayette No. 3, and Beaufort No. 4 had become extinct. South Carolina No. 1 was dormant, as was the Grand Encampment of South Carolina.
In 1844, Sir Joseph Stapleton reported that he had granted a Dispensation to South Carolina No. 1 on May 17, 1843, to resume their labors, their warrant or Charter from the General Grand Encampment having been lost by fire. A new Charter was granted without fee on September 12, 1844. At the Triennial Conclave of 1844, Sir Albert Case is listed as the representative of the Grand Encampment of South Carolina. He was elected General Grand Prelate at that meeting. South Carolina Encampment No. 1 continued more or less active, though dormant during the Civil War.
Columbia No . 2 at Columbia was re­established by a Dispensation granted by Grand Master Hopkins on June 11, 1875. A Charter was granted on August 30, 1877.
Spartanburg No. 3 at Spartanburg received a Dispensation on October 1, 1891, from Grand Master J. P. S. Gobin, which was continued at the Triennial meeting on August 11, 1892. A Charter was granted on August 29, 1895.
In 1901, Grand Master R. H. Lloyd granted a Dispensation for Greenville Commandery No. 4 at Greenville. A Charter was granted on August 29, 1901. A previous Dispensation had been granted on August 30, 1875, for Palmetto No. 3 at Greenville, but the Commandery was never organized due to the death of Sir Knight D. L. Hill, who had been named Eminent Commander.
Greenwood Commandery at Green­wood received a Dispensation from Grand Master G, M. Moulton on November 15, 1906, Newberry Commandery at Newberry on November 20, 1906, and Chester Commandery at Chester on March 20, 1907. The Grand Encampment ordered that the fees paid for their Dispensations and their records be turned over to the newly formed Grand Commandery of South Carolina that proper action might be taken to issue Charters.
On March 14, 1907, Grand Master G. M. Moulton issued a warrant for the formation of the Grand Commandery of South Carolina. It was constituted by the Grand Master on March 25, 1907, in the City of Columbia. Sir Knight Jacob T. Barron was elected the first Grand Commander.
In 1948 there were 15 Commanderies and 2,142 members.2019-2,577

SOUTH DAKOTA

On February 22, 1884, Grand Master
R. E. Withers issued a warrant for the formation of the Grand Commandery of Dakota Territory designating Sir Theodore Parvin as his proxy. The Grand Commandery was constituted on May 14, 1884, and Sir Samuel Roy was elected the first Grand Commander. The following Commanderies were active:
Dakota No. 1 at Deadwood received a Dispensation from Grand Master V. L. Hurlbut on May 7, 1880, and was granted a Charter on August 18, 1880.
Cyrene No. 2 at Sioux Falls received a Dispensation from Grand Master Benj. Dean on August 14, 1881, and was granted a Charter on August 23, 1883.
DeMolay No. 3 at Yankton received a Dispensation from Grand Master Benj. Dean on February 25, 1882, and was granted a Charter on August 23, 1883.
Tancred No. 4 at Bismarck and Fargo No. 5 at Fargo, Chartered on August 13, 1883, were located in the portion that was to be North Dakota and have been considered previously.
Following the Division of the Territory of Dakota, it was deemed best to have a separate Grand Commandery for the jurisdictions of the states of North and South Dakota. The Grand Commandery of Dakota Territory, occupying the area of the present state of South Dakota, was continued under the name of the Grand Commandery of South Dakota.
The Grand Commandery of South Dakota was constituted on June 5, 1890. Sir Knight J. F. Schrader was elected the first Grand Commander. By a resolution, the jewels used by the Grand Commandery of Dakota Territory were presented to the newly organized Grand Commandery of North Dakota.
Eight Commanderies formerly under the jurisdiction of the Grand Commandery of Dakota Territory became subordinate to the new Grand Commandery of South Dakota. The first three- Dakota a No. 1 at Deadwood; Cyrene No. 2 at Sioux Falls; and DeMolay No. 3 at Yankton-had been established by the Grand Encampment. Following the organization of the Grand Commandery of Dakota Territory in 1889 and up to 1890, five more Commanderies were established under its authority in the area of the present state of South Dakota. They were (by Commandery, location, date of Dispensation, date of Charter):
La-Co-Tah No. 6, Huron, April 8, 1884; May 14, 1884., Waterton No. 7, Waterton, September 6, 1884; June 19, 1885, Schrader No. 9, Rapid City, August 5, 1886; June 9, 1887.Damascus No. 10, Aberdeen, January 3, 1887; June 9, 1887. St. Bernard No. 11, Mitchell, July 19, 1887; May 30, 1888.
In 1948 there were 20 Commanderies and 2,200 members.2019-428

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TENNESSEE
Nashville No. 1 at Nashville received a Dispensation in November 1846 from Deputy Grand Master Joseph K. Stapleton and was granted a Charter on September 16, 1847.
Yorkville No. 2 at Yorkville received a Dispensation from Grand Master W. B. Hubbard on July 10, 1857 and was granted a Charter on September 17, 1859.
DeMolay No. 3 at Columbia received a Dispensation from Grand Master W. B. Hubbard on December 20, 1857, and was granted a Charter on September 16, 1859.
Cyrene No. 4 at Memphis received a Dispensation from Grand Master W. B. Hubbard on March 27, 1859, and was granted a Charter on September 16, 1859 .
The formation of the Grand Commandery of Tennessee was approved by the Grand Encampment on September 16, 1859. On October 3, 1859, Grand Master
B. B. French issued a warrant for that purpose, designating Sir Lucius J. Polk as his proxy. The Grand Commandery was constituted on October 12, 1859. Sir Charles A. Fuller was elected as the first Grand Commander.
In 1948 there were 24 Commanderies and 4,997 members.2019-3,245

TEXAS
On December 31, 1853, Grand Master Hubbard issued a warrant for the formation of the Grand Commandery of Texas, which was constituted on January 18, 1855.
The first Commandery established in Texas, then in the Republic of Mexico, was San Felipe de Austin, which received a Charter on December 10, 1835. In 1850, Grand Master Hubbard decided that San Felipe , Commandery, then located in Galveston, would be No. 1.
Ruthven No. 2 at Houston received a Dispensation from Deputy Grand Master
J. K. Stapleton on February 2, 1848, and was granted a Charter on September 12, 1850.
Palestine No. 3 at Palestine received a Dispensation from Grand Master W. B. Hubbard on May 16, 1853, and was gran­ ted a Charter on September 19, 1853.
In 1948 there were 86 Commanderies and 18,525 members.2019-6,072

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UTAH

On March 3, 1910, Grand Master Rugg issued a warrant for the formation of the Grand Commandery of Utah, naming Sir Knights Jesse Converse and Frank
M. Foote of Wyoming as his proxies. The Grand Commandery was constituted on April 20, 1910. Sir Knight Samuel Paul was elected Grand Commander. There were three subordinate Commanderies.
Utah No. 1 at Salt Lake City received a Dispensation from Grand Master J. Q. A. Fellows on December 20, 1873, and was granted a Charter on December 3, 1874.
El Monte No. 2 at Ogden received a Dispensation from Acting Grand Master Charles Roome on October 22, 1885, and was granted a Charter on September 23, 1886.
Malta No. 3 at Park City received a Dispensation from Grand Master G. M. Moulton on June 21, 1905, and was granted a Charter on July 11, 1907.
In 1948 there were 5 Commanderies and 1,014 members.2019-295

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VERMONT

At the meeting of the General Grand Encampment in September 18 26, it was reported by the Deputy General Grand Master, Henry Fowle, that he had granted Charters to the following Encampments in Vermont: Vermont at Windsor on February 23, 1821 ; Green Mountain at Rutland on March 12, 1823; and Mount Calvary at Middlebury on February 20, 1824. At this same meeting, the approbation of the General Grand Officers was given to the formation of the Grand Encampment of Vermont. Sir John H. Cotton was the first Grand Commander. The Grand Encampment was represented by Sir Isaac C. Hubbard who was elected Genera l Grand Warder in 1826 , General Grand Junior Warden in 1829, and General Grand Senior Warden in 1832.
The Grand Encampment of Vermont granted a Charter to Lafayette Encampment at East Berkshire sometime before 1829. The Grand Encampment of Vermont met for the last time in 1831 until its revival in 1851.
At the Triennial Conclave of the General Grand Encampment in September, 1850 , the General Grand Captain General, Sir Charles W. Moore reported that since the meeting of 1847 he had granted a Dispensation to Burlington No. 2 at Burlington. A Charter was granted on September 11, 1850.
Calvary Encampment at Middlebury was reorganized by a Dispensation from 1848.
The new Charter was issued September 12, 1850, without charge . La Fayette Encampment at Berkshire was revived by a Dispensation granted by Grand Master W. B. Hubbard on November 10, 1850. At the meeting of the General Grand · Encampment on September 14, 1853 , the General Grand Recorder was authorized to endorse the old Charter , confirming the action by the Grand Encampment in 1850.
In December 1850, the Deputy General Grand Master, W. H. Ellis, granted authority for the Grand Encampment of Vermont to reorganize, which was done on January 14 , 18 52, at Burlington. Sir Samuel L. Bartlett was elected Grand Commander .
In 1948 there were 13 Commanderies and 2,408 members.2019-318

VIRGINIA

As early as 1812 there is evidence that there was an Encampment at Winchester, working under authority of Winchester Hiram Lodge No. 21. On March 24, 181 6, St. John's Rising Star Encampment was organized in Richmond.
Early in 1823, James Cushman, claiming to be a representative of the Deputy Grand Master , visited the Richmond Encampment and through him a Charter was obtained from the General Grand Encampment. The Charter is dated April 10, 1823, though it is recorded in the Proceedings of 1823 as May 5, 1823. Since St. John's Encampment had been in existence before the organization of the General Grand Encampment , it should have received a Charter of Recognition instead of the regular Charter costing $90,000.
The same year, the visit of Cushman to Winchester Encampment lead to difficulties there and Winchester Encampment proceeded to issue Charters for the formation of Mt. Carmel Encampment and Warren Encampment at Harpers Ferry.
On November 27, 1823, these three Encampments met in Winchester and formed the Grand Encampment of Virginia. Following the formation of the Grand Encampment, application was made to DeWitt Clinton, who replied that upon receipt of an official statement of their action, he would recognize them as a regularly constituted state Grand Encampment. Before this was done, James Cushman persuaded them that their procedure was irregular, and that each of the Encampments should first obtain a Charter from the General Grand Encampment. Warren and Winchester did so and received Charters of Recognition on July 4, 18 24. Mt. Carmel refused to do so and became extinct.
On August 11, 1824, Richmond Encampment was advised of the existence of the State Grand Encampment and was invited to join, which she did. On March 23, 1825, representatives from Winchester, Richmond and Warren Encampments met in Winchester. The organization of the Grand Encampment of Virginia was completed and was recognized by the General Grand Encampment. This action was reported in the Proceedings of the Conclave of 1826. Lynchburg No . 4 and four more Encampments were added by 1828. The Grand Encampment of Virginia was not very active during the next few years.
On August 21, 18 38 , A Dispensation was granted for an Encampment at Wheeling and a Charter was granted on September 12, 18 44 . This action was resented by the Grand Encampment of Virginia, which declared it had not been dormant as claimed by the General Grand Encampment. On December 11, 1845, delegates from a number of the Encampments in Virginia met in Richmond and proceeded to form a new State Grand Commandery, which was declared illegal by the General Grand Encampment. This new State Commandery finally joined with the General Grand Encampment in January 1851. After considerable controversy, Wheeling Encampment was transferred to the jurisdiction of the Grand Encampment of Virginia, in 1853.
In 1871, the Grand Commandery of Virginia sent a memo to the Grand Encampment asking leave to withdraw from the jurisdiction of the Grand Encampment, which was refused.
In 1948 there were 31 Commanderies and 5,778 members.2019-1,626

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WASHINGTON

On May 5, 1887, a petition was presented from the four Commanderies in the Territory of Washington to form a Grand Commandery. Grand Master Charles Roome issued a warrant naming Sir Rockey P. Earhart as his proxy to constitute the new Grand Commandery of Washington, which was done on June 2, 1887 . Sir Harrison W. Egan was the first Grand Commander . The four Sub­ ordinate Commanderies were:
Washington No . 1 at Walla Walla which received a Dispensation from Grand Master Benjamin Dean on April 19, 1882, and was granted a Charter on August 23, 188 3.
Seattle No. 2 at Seattle, which received a Dispensation from Grand Master Benjamin Dean on February 22, 1883, and was granted a Charter on August 23, 188 3.
Cataract No. 3 at Spokane, which received a Dispensation from Acting Grand Master Charles Roome on July 30, 1885, and was granted a Charter on September 23, 1886 .
Ivanhoe No. 4 at Tacoma, which received a Dispensation from Acting Grand Master Charles Roome on March 23, 1886, and was granted a Charter on September 23, 1886. In 1948 there were 28 Commanderies and 5,274 members.2019-635

WEST VIRGINIA

West Virginia became a state on June 20, 1863 . From the time of its organization in 1823 the Grand Encampment of Virginia had exercised jurisdiction over the territory now included in the state of West Virginia. In 1838, when the General Grand Encampment considered the Grand Encampment of Virginia dormant , an Encampment at Wheeling received a Dispensation and a Charter from that body. After some year's controversy, Wheeling Encampment, in 1853, gave allegiance to the Grand Encampment of Virginia. Following the formation of the state of West Virginia, the General Grand Encampment did not claim jurisdiction but left it under the jurisdiction of Virginia. In 1871, this was clearly stated as the position of the Grand Encampment.
On December 12, 1872, at the session of the Grand Commandery of Virginia, a petition was presented from the three Commanderies in West Virginia asking the dissolution of their allegiance to that grand body so that they might form a Grand Commandery in West Virginia. This was granted, and on November 21, 1873, a convention was held in Wheeling and a petition sent to the Grand Encampment. Grand Master J. Q. A. Fellows issued a warrant and named Past Grand Master J. Hopkins as his proxy to constitute the new Grand Commandery of West Virginia, which he did on Febru­ary 25, 1874. Sir Knight Odell S. Long was elected the first Grand Commander.
At this time the following Commanderies were in existence in West Virginia:
Wheeling No . 1 at Wheeling, which had received a Dispensation from the Grand Encampment on August 21, 1838, and a Charter on September 12, 1844.
Palestine No. 9 at Martinsburg and Star of the West No. 12 at Morgantown were both chartered by the Grand Commandery of Virginia.
There was also a Commandery under Dispensation at Charleston.
Older Encampments in West Virginia, namely, Warren at Harpers Ferry and Winchester at Winchester, had become extinct at this time.
In 1948 there were 27 Commanderies and 5,185 members.2019-1,900

WISCONSIN

On September 16, 1859 , the Grand Encampment gave approval for the formation of a Grand Encampment for the state of Wisconsin. On October 17 , 1859, Grand Master B. B. French issued a warrant for the same , and the Grand Commandery of Wisconsin was constituted on October 20, 1859. Sir Knight Henry L. Palmer was the first Grand Commander. The following three Commanderies were the petitioners for the Grand Commander:
Wisconsin No. 1 at Milwaukee, which received a Dispensation from Grand Master W. B. Hubbard on July 12, 1849, and was granted a Charter on September 11, 1850.
Janesville No. 2 at Janesville, which received a Dispensation on June 29, 1856, from Grand Master W. B. Hubbard and was granted a Charter on September 11,1856.
Robert Macoy No. 3 at Madison, which received a Dispensation from Grand Master W. B. Hubbard on January 29, 1859, and was granted a Charter on September 16, 1859.In 1948 there were 44 Commanderies and 7,058 members.2019-642

WYOMING
On September 23, 1886, the Grand Encampment adopted a resolution authorizing the formation of a Grand Commandery in Wyoming. On January 30, 1888, a petition was presented to Grand Master Roome, who issued a warrant naming Sir Knight W. B. Trufant as his proxy. The Grand Commandery of Wyoming was constituted on March 7, 1888. Sir Thomas B. Hicks was elected the first Grand Commander.
Wyoming No. 1 at Cheyenne received a Dispensation from Grand Master J. Q. A. Fellows on March 15, 1873, and was granted a Charter on December 3, 1874.
Ivanhoe No. 2 at Rawlins received a Dispensation from Grand Master R. E. Withers on February 9, 1885, and was granted a Charter on September 23, 1886.
Immanuel No. 3 at Laramie received a Dispensation from Acting Grand Master Charles Roome on May 1, 1886, and was granted a Charter on September 23, 1886.
In 1948 there were 16 Commanderies and 1,642 members.2019-480


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GRAND COMMANDERIES OUTSIDE USA

AUSTRIA-August 12, 2015

BRAZIL-August 12, 2015

CROATIA-August 14, 2012

ITALY-August 20, 1991

MEXICO
Tampico No. 7 Tampico On December 4, 1920, a petition was presented to Grand Master J. K. Orr, who granted a Dispensation on August 7, 1921. A visit by Sir W. F. Kuhn on March 22, 1922, resulted in a favorable report and a Charter was granted on April 27, 1922.
Ivanhoe No. 7 Mexico City On December 4, 1925, Grand Master Vallery granted a Dispensation for a Commandery at Mexico City, upon the petition of twenty-five Sir Knights. Sir Stephan Motta was appointed Eminent Commander. The Charter was granted on July 18, 1928, and the Commandery was constituted by Sir W. E. Leckie on September 24, 1928 .

PANAMA-August 14, 2012

PHILLIPPINES Islands
Far East No. 7 Manila
On December 2, 1907, Grand Master
H. W. Rugg granted a Dispensation for the establishment of Far East Commandery No. 1 at Manila. The Commandery was organized on January 28, 1908, with Sir Knight James J. Peterson as Eminent Commander. The Charter was granted on August 11, 1910.Member 2019-511

PORTUGAL-August 18, 2003

ROMANIA-August 18, 2009

TOGO-August 19, 2009


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PRECEDENCE OF SUBORDINATE COMMANDERIES BASED UPON DATES OF THEIR RESPECTIVE CHARTERS
(UPDATED September 2019)
1. Porto Rico No. 1, San Juan, Puerto Rico ......................................June 24, 1916
2. Tampico No. 1, Tampico, Mexico ............................................... April 22, 1922
3. Tokyo No. 1, Tokyo, Japan ..........................................................December 29, 1958
4. Bavaria No. 3, Munich, Germany ................................................. December 29, 1958
5. Heidelberg No. 2, Mannheim, Germany ........................................ December 19, 1961
6. Hermann von Salza, No. 1, Frankfort, Germany ..............................December 29, 1961
7. * Guatemala No. 1, Guatemala City, Guatemala ............................March 20, 1972
8. Harry J. Miller No. 5, Kaiserslautern, Germany ................................August 14, 1979
9. Simon von Utrecht No. 6, Hamburg, Germany ................................ August 14, 1979
10. Carabobo No. 2, Valencia, Venezuela ..............................................August 20, 1991
11. Solo di Aruba No. 1, Christiansted, Aruba .........................................August 20, 1991
12. Canaan No. 1, Fredericksted, St. Croix, Virgin Islands ........................ August 20, 1991
13. Taipei No. 1, Taipei City, Taiwan, Republic of China ......................... August 14, 2000
14. El Salvador No. 1, San Salvador .......................................................August 10, 2015
15. Mariscal Francisco Solano Lopez No. 1, Asuncion, Paraguay ............ August 10, 2015
16. Peru No. 1, Lima, Peru ................................................................... August 10, 2015
17. Quito Commandery U.D. Ecuador ...................................................August 31, 2017
18. Ali Bongo Ondimba U.S. (Gabon) ...................................................September 12, 2019
* Charter Suspended 06/22/1991 - Restored 08/13/2012


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Since September 23, 2019